Book of the dead preston and child

book of the dead preston and child

4. Juni Dies ist der letze Band der offiziellen Trilogie um die beiden Pendergast-Brüder und das Warten hat sich gelohnt. Nach den für S.A. Pendergast. Douglas Preston / Lincoln Child: The Book of the Dead deutscher Titel: Maniac - Fluch der Vergangenheit Kaufen* bei Amazon Booklooker. The Book of the Dead (Agent Pendergast series) | Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand . Mörderische Jagd Dance of Death. Labor des Todes Mount Dragon Riptide. I also think the ending could have been a tad better, but it is also a great set up for the next book! Dies gelingt manches Mal besser oder auch schlechter, was der Spannung aber nicht schadet. Sehr spannend, auch wenn man nicht im Detail hinter die Fassade schauen sollte, denn da ist nicht alles schlüssig. Dezember Verkauf durch: They are all exiting and hardly to decide casino regeln usa one to read to finish. A young woman with an extrodinary Beste Spielothek in Springhirsch finden, on th edge of a violent breakdown Wenn man amazon glauben darf, spielt Constance, über casino bellevue ich ohnehin mehr erfahren möchte, im neuen Buch eine wichtigere Rolle als bisher. Which was very cool because it was signed by the authors. Tomorrow, he will learn her most guarded secrets, leaving him to wonder: Pendergast ends up on the run from the Feds while he tries to figure out a way to defeat his evil brother, who is always one step ahead of him. I dschungelcamp quoten where the book online casino max bonus the climax lost me as it almost felt rushed to resolve both the book and the zoom meeting deutsch. Amazon Rapids Fun stories for kids on the go. Well, I guess the magnificent run of Pendergast novels couldn't last forever. Jan 13, Rob Thompson rated it really liked it Shelves: To see what your friends thought of this book, please fc bayern vs freiburg up. Suspense and mystery bonus code no deposit club gold casino. May 18, Cherie rated it it was amazing Shelves: They are both intelligent, brilliant and 5 steps ahead of us stupid people. He crawls into a large magician's box when he's vfl wolfsburg stürmer and he sees something so evil which is never fully explained that now as a man, he wants to kill Beste Spielothek in Sandersdorf finden. Child nächstes spiel von borussia dortmund Preston have an amazing ability to intertwine history and mystery within a modern conundrum. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Also, I wasn't too impressed with the wrap-up of the whole Diogenes sequence. East Dane Designer Men's Fashion. His brilliant psychotic brother, about to perpetrate a horrific crime To research the book, Preston and a friend retraced on horseback 1, miles portugalia chorwacja mecz Coronado's route across Arizona and New Mexico, packing their supplies and sleeping under the stars--nearly killing themselves in the process. Which is where this review Beauty Salon Slot Machine Online ᐈ ™ Casino Slots. Customers martin kaymer live ticker viewed this item also viewed. It's been beaten to death. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Flaschscore.de the Pendergast trilogy, I was most disappointed in this book. All the characters came to life for me. The museum's hierarchy decide to best way to circumvent the "bad press" and public outcry is to reopen a revitalized century-old Egyptian exhibit, The Tomb of Senef. One person found this helpful. There's a very evil bad-guy maniac. The plot, the cliffhangers, the main characters and some of the peripheral ones all have this in common: This was such a tremendous journey with the two brothers that I'm not sad to see it over because I'm really looking forward to the next chapter, the next book sounds quite potent and meaty and I might need a bit of a break to let my brain prepare mobirl another greatness of Preston and Child. Seite 1 von 1 Zum Anfang Seite 1 von 1. Genau das sind die Roman von Preston und Child geworden. Hadn't finished reading it yet casino ico I read two other Pendergast books at the same time. Readers can sign up for The Pendergast File, a monthly "strangely entertaining note" from the authors, at their website, www. Cemetery Dance Agent Pendergast series.

Book Of The Dead Preston And Child Video

ASOIAF Theory: The Others, or, You Can Have My Theory When You Pry It From My Cold Dead Hands

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Geld verdienen mit Amazon. Mehr lesen Weniger lesen. Noras Recherche bringt zutage, dass die Ausstellung im Jahr aufgrund mysteriöser Todesfälle geschlossen wurde. Nach Brimstone folgt also Dance of the Death. I got an advance copy! The Cabinet of Curiosities Agent Pendergast series. One of Pendergast's most implacable, most feared enemies is found on his doorstep, dead. Allerdings habe ich selten einen Autoren gelesen, der sich so gekonnt bei sich selbst bedient hätte: Preston, Douglas and Lincoln Child Schlagworte: The cliffhanger ending absolutely begs the reader to immediately read the next book.

Book of the dead preston and child -

Again, familiar characters like D'Agosta, Nora Kelly and Smithback are back on the plot, but not all of them gain on depth in this volume. Cemetery Dance Agent Pendergast series. Still, this trilogy is a good read and a good value if you read it on your Kindle. Englisch Kindle E-Reader Kindle 5. Geld verdienen mit Amazon.

A tepid contribution to the series. I really hope it picks up again. Great conclusion to the Diogenes Trilogy within the Pendergast series! Nothing like a bombshell ending to make you immediately want to pick up the next book.

Oct 03, J. Grice rated it really liked it Shelves: Another excellent thriller featuring Agent Pendergast. The last of the hair-raising Diogenes trilogy within the Pendergast series.

I loved this trilogy. This last one was really a nail-biter and gave me goosebumps. Prepare for several travesties where you are constantly asking yourself what is really going on and wondering if the characters can recover.

Resilience can be found in the strangest of places. If you push a person too far, you just might find out wha The last of the hair-raising Diogenes trilogy within the Pendergast series.

If you push a person too far, you just might find out what they are made of. Oct 01, Karl Marberger rated it really liked it Shelves: Lots of action and good dialogue.

Great to see the whole ensemble of recurring characters interact. Might write a review of sorts for the Pendergast-Diogenes trilogy later.

I thoroughly enjoyed this, although I find myself having to suspend my disbelief at times, and wishing that the resolution at the end panned out differently.

Highly readable, thrilling, and pretty darn hard to put down - I'm sure the rate I've been finishing up these books was a positive sign.

Suspense and mystery lovers. One dreary December evening some years ago, I slogged in to my local Fred Meyer, stamping snow off my shoes, and encountered a tall, friendly, dapper gentlemen hawking paperback books near the door.

He introduced himself as Douglas Preston and said the book, Relic , was being made into a movie. I thought, Yeah, sure. So why are you standing here in a deserted grocery store in Kennewick, Washington, on a night like this?

I sort of felt sorry for the guy, so I bought the book. About 24 hours later, One dreary December evening some years ago, I slogged in to my local Fred Meyer, stamping snow off my shoes, and encountered a tall, friendly, dapper gentlemen hawking paperback books near the door.

About 24 hours later, completely wrung out, I finished the book, wondering why I had so enjoyed being scared out of my mind.

I decided that next time this pair published a book, I would get on the roller-coaster and take another ride.

This one was a doozy! Reread in October great choice for the Halloween season! Five years was long enough for me to forget much of he plot and, therefore, be able to appreciate the suspense in The Book of the Dead.

Also, having read several books in the Pendergast series lately, I was more engaged in sharing the adventures with characters I know.

Jun 17, Chris rated it it was amazing. Forget James Patterson, folks, these guys know what they're doing and do it better than pretty much anyone. Thorough, well-researched storylines, but not the type i.

Da Vinci Code that bogs down the thrust of the storytelling. Oh yeah, and most of their novels feature one of the most compelling protagonists in modern fiction Many of their books feature Pendergast as well as a host of recurring characters, and a few are stand-alones, but to make it simple, start with Relic and no, if you've seen the awful Pendergast-less movie, there is NO comparison , and its sequel, Reliquary, and go on to Cabinet of Curiosities, Still Life with Crows, and on to what is referred to as "The Diogenes trilogy", which is Brimstone, Dance of Death, and The Book of the Dead.

Which is where this review begins. Needless to say, for those not drawn into the fold, as it were, I will try to keep spoilers to a minimum so don't read on any further.

The novel completes the Diogenes Trilogy, which pits Pendergast against his diabolical younger brother, Diogenes, who--in the previous novel--concocted an elaborate scheme to eventually send his brother to prison, for a crime he didn't commit.

But this was only the tip of the iceberg. Diogenes has a much larger, deadlier plan. The museum's hierarchy decide to best way to circumvent the "bad press" and public outcry is to reopen a revitalized century-old Egyptian exhibit, The Tomb of Senef.

Of course, in the process of doing so, mysterious and gruesome murders occur, causing some to think the Grand Reopening of the Tomb should be postponed, but of course the show must go on!

As Diogenes's plan unfolds, which entails secretive visits to Pendergasts' young ward from The Cabinet of Curiousities, Constance Greene, in order to seduce her with his version of the truth, Pendergast manages to escape prison in an attempt to thwart Diogenes's Coup de Grace at the museum's Grand Reopening of the Tomb.

This might seem like a LOT going on and it is, but the authors deftly and smartly interweave the plot and subplots in such a way to make it seamless.

The stunning climax is fitting, and the surprise at the end will leave readers wanting to pick up the next novel, The Wheel of Darkness.

View all 6 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Book of the Dead is the last of three in the Agent Pendergast series.

I'm not sure why it's a trilogy, though, because there are actually six or 7 books with that character and they're all somehow related. Dance of Death and this book focus on the hatred and battle between the Pendergast brothers, FBI Special Agent Aloysius and his brilliant but murderously pathological brother Diogenes.

The previous book left off with Diogenes framing his brother for some horrific crimes and then stealing m The Book of the Dead is the last of three in the Agent Pendergast series.

The previous book left off with Diogenes framing his brother for some horrific crimes and then stealing millions of dollars worth of diamonds from the Museum of History.

Aloysius goes to prison and Diogenes drops out of sight These two books reunite some old favorite characters from early stories. Of the Pendergast trilogy, I was most disappointed in this book.

I know I'm in the minority because most people really enjoyed the series and I wondered if I missed the boat somehow. The first part of the book was too slow for me.

There was too much time spent on trying to break Pendergast in prison and police captain Laura Hayward being too proud to listen to Detective D'Agosta.

One thing is for sure: Two murders occurred before the opening of the Tomb of Senef I guess those monkeys never learn. There was a character that turned me off and why was his last scene with the warden necessary?

The man should have been deposited in a prison himself, not deported to another FBI office! Everyone of the books has had the prerequisite Ass in Charge.

A plotline that was a total turn off but ended out well: Diogenes seducing Constance Green. I guess it was predictable but it was done too easily.

What came later was awesome! The second part of the book was a lot more interesting and the only reason I gave the book 3 stars.

At that point, Pendergast has been broken out of one of those "no one can escape from here prisons" and reunited with his old crime fighting buddy Vincent D'Agosta.

Laura Hayward's come to her senses and realizes she needs to unite with D'Agosta and Pendergast to save all those unfortunates in the Tomb of Senef Best of all was the sudden change in Constance Greene.

Her pursuit and battle with Diogenes scenes were the best I've read in a long time. I felt cheated by "The Event".

I absolutely can see one brother goading another into trouble, I just can't see that particular outcome. Diogenes supposedly suffered brain damage in the ventromedial frontal cortex from the incident, which involved lights and sound.

For revenge, he wanted to induce it in millions of people. His first two victims had total psychotic breaks and became violent. They were beyond reason and so I wondered how Diogenes was able to think at all or be around people--years of self control?

I couldn't find any information on the so-called "Higginbottom region" but maybe it's out there somewhere.

I know there's at least one more book now, one that focuses more on Constance Green. I haven't decided whether I want to read it or not.

I've been alternately exasperated, bored, and enthralled with the story so far I tend to enjoy books in a series more and more when I've developed a "relationship" with the characters.

This may not be the best written book in the series, but it feels like it to me because it is so true to the characters. Raise your hand if you really think a detective can be as near-omniscient as Sherlock Holmes.

Now, that being said, if you still enjoy suspending your disbelief enough to enjoy the improbable mastery of minutiae that Arthur Conan Doyle as Warning: Now, that being said, if you still enjoy suspending your disbelief enough to enjoy the improbable mastery of minutiae that Arthur Conan Doyle ascribed to Holmes, you would probably enjoy the Pendergast novels of Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston.

Some of the dust jackets of the hardbound versions of these novels compare Special F. Agent Pendergast and the Consulting Detective known as Holmes.

And how about all of those wonderful disguises used by both Aloysius and Diogenes Pendergast?! Frankly, if I had to believe the martial arts prowess demonstrated in one scene combined with the improbable escape in another, I would have exiled Child and Preston from the Wilsonian Library long ago.

Although they are clearly set in the latter part of the 20th century or first part of this century, they have atmospherics redolent of medieval Italy, antebellum U.

Child and Preston have an amazing ability to intertwine history and mystery within a modern conundrum.

Not content with locked room mysteries, they insist on locked museum and locked prison mysteries, in spite of high-tech surveillance equipment and fail-safe procedures.

Ancient artifacts and legends are juxtaposed against surprisingly modern technologies and methodologies. Most amazing to me in this novel was an introspective journey taken by Agent Pendergast at a critical point in the plot.

For the purposes of the novel, it was an amazing way to handle exposition of the plot without resorting to a hokey dialogue.

It was as suspenseful as many of the action scenes. There is a marvelous interplay between loyalty and betrayal played off between the various ongoing relationships we have seen developing in the course of the series, as well as the new one developing in this book.

It may well be because of my interesting in the Ancient Near East in general and in Egyptology in specific that I found this book more satisfying than usual, but I think this may have been the best yet.

Aug 09, JoJo rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Recommended to JoJo by: Although all three books can be read without the other, if you read the last one first like i did, it ruins earlier books because you find out stuff ahead, like reading the last chapter of a book first.

Aug 10, C-shaw rated it it was amazing. Their writing is crisp and action-packed, with short chapters that can be read in a hurry.

One of the things I enjoy about a book is to come across words with which I am not familiar, in which case I usually look up the definition and write it in the book margin, thus hopefully improving my vocabulary.

This book is No. You never fail to steer me to good reads, Matthew. I neglected everything and read pages in two days.

I feel like all my reviews for the Pendergast series are starting to sound the same, I'm gushing as if in love about how fantastic the books are but its still true, this story is phenomenal and it makes you want to read another and another, this could easily have thirty volumes and I would still want to read them all, as usual this book reads smooth as silk while the action cuts like a knife.

The Book of The Dead is the standard great stuff that one would expect from the insightful and intelligen I feel like all my reviews for the Pendergast series are starting to sound the same, I'm gushing as if in love about how fantastic the books are but its still true, this story is phenomenal and it makes you want to read another and another, this could easily have thirty volumes and I would still want to read them all, as usual this book reads smooth as silk while the action cuts like a knife.

The Book of The Dead is the standard great stuff that one would expect from the insightful and intelligent duo, their stories breathe a life of their own and to me they feel different than other novels.

Our world is filled with books, one can find them everywhere but whenever I read a Pendergast novel I feel as if I was holding something of heft and value, there is knowledge in these pages; ancient cultures, science, architecture, folklore and mysticism, curses, artifacts and it all sounds real enough to touch and some of it is but I especially adore all the breathtaking characters both good and bad and some in-between, in my opinion they are invaluable to the books.

I guess they speak to me, true love haha Pendergast lives in my mind beyond the pages of the book, that's how great he is. The third in the Diogenes Pendergast trilogy and seventh in the Aloysius Pendergast series I highly recommend starting with Relic, Pendergast 1 story continues on the wild hunt to catch and expose the elusive Diogenes who is conveniently presumed to be dead by everyone but the small circle of our heroes.

The Queen of Narnia, The Heart of Eternity, The Indigo Ghost, Ultima Thule, The Fourth of July, The Zanzibar Green and of course Lucifer's Heart, all precious diamonds that were stole in the last installment are destroyed by Diogenes and arrive pulverized into a rainbow colored snow to the museum as a final act of madness and show of power.

The previous book was simply fantastic and it exposed Diogenes' identity but only to the reader, the entire museum still has no idea that not only is Diogenes alive but his secret identity is walking right under their noses.

To make matters worse, Aloysius Pendergast is in a top security prison and everyone that has always been jealous of him is gunning for the guy to go down, he deals with that brilliantly, boy that was fun!

Even though Aloysius is locked up he is the only one who can match up against his evil and twisted genius of a brother, their journey takes them half way through the globe and back.

My personal favorite part of the tale was the prison sequence, well pretty much all of it, I don't want to spoil anything but what happens to Pendergast in the prison is nuts.

I read all the parts while holding my breath, some I had to re-read because they were simply too good to only read once.

Ingenious and stunning, no deus-ex machina way out of this puppy! Lots of stuff happens, there is also the museum exhibit with a tomb that appears to be cursed, madness and mayhem breaks out as usual, lovers of museum thrillers will have a ball with the Tomb of Senef and those who love Pendergast will gobble up everything he does and says.

I was finally impressed with Constance, I never really gave her much thought before but through this book she became another strong contender for future stories and my dear Vincent D'Agosta, he was wonderful as was Laura Hayward.

For some reason Laura Linney the actress kept popping into my head when Hayward's scenes came up, she was something, the woman can hold her own.

This was such a tremendous journey with the two brothers that I'm not sad to see it over because I'm really looking forward to the next chapter, the next book sounds quite potent and meaty and I might need a bit of a break to let my brain prepare for another greatness of Preston and Child.

I don't read them back to back on purpose as much as I really want to, after all it's not good to eat dessert three times a day, same with books, I save the good stuff to be savored when I'm really in the mood for greatness.

Jun 03, Mike Moore rated it it was ok. Remember those old movies that blended cartoons and live action? This book reminded me of those, perhaps more the latter than the former.

The book starts with promise, presenting some compelling scenes and introducing some believable characters. Than we're introduced to the villain and the hero, two ridiculous cartoons striding through a world of normals.

The plot quickly spins out of the realm of the remotely plausible, as the cartoons seem to infect Remember those old movies that blended cartoons and live action?

The plot quickly spins out of the realm of the remotely plausible, as the cartoons seem to infect those around them, transforming the hapless humans into wacky, goofy caricatures that can then careen wildly through what's left of my credulity.

Any attempt to prevent spoilers ends here. I'm actually not that hard a case for this kind of thing. I'm generally happy to suspend disbelief and accept the world that the author wants to present, as long as its consistent and fulfills its objective in this case, pure entertainment.

So, even though I couldn't read the scenes with Diogenes Pendergast without seeing a wild eyed animated Christopher Lloyd in my mind, I was enjoying the book enough for a generally favorable three stars review.

There were two things that lost me though. First, I really want characters to have legitimate motivation. In this book, Diogenes is motivated to spend about a billion dollars, wantonly destroy half a million more in diamonds, dedicate about 15 years of his life to performing about man-years of work in a variety of disciplines that are not remotely related yeah okay, he's a cartoon, whatever , and kill dozens of people because You know, there was this thing that happened to him when he was a kid, and it just made him That's beyond what I can will away by suspension of disbelief.

Why is she there? Why should we care about her? And why does Diogenes risk his whole plan to sneak into her room and seduce her? Okay fine, he's crazy like that he doesn't need a reason, but these are still the most ridiculous and seemingly pointless scenes of the whole book, and that's really saying something.

Well, it turns out that the reason for it all is so that Constance can come from out of nowhere in the end of the book and kill Diogenes by wrestling him into a live volcano.

She has to do it, because the main character can't bring himself to. She falls in as well. I'm pretty sure the volcano has some ominous name, like Mount Doom or the Gate of Hell or something.

So we have pages and pages of painful scenes that have the sole purpose of manufacturing Golumn so that she can jump into a volcano.

It's transparent in retrospect, because there was no other possible reason for those scenes to exist. That's beyond sloppy storytelling.

View all 4 comments. I picked this book up from my local library for a dollar. I believe it was a dollar well spent.

The creepy factor was right up there. I like how the authors used modern day techniques to achieve horrific situations.

This was definitely a thrill ride and I enjoyed my time on it. Feb 05, Paul rated it it was ok Shelves: I enjoyed Douglas Preston's recent best-selling sci-fi thriller, Impact also reviewed here on Facebook , but did not much like this one, a bit of airport trash he co-wrote with Lincoln Child.

It's not as bad as Ted Bell's Spy reviewed here: The Book of the Dead is one of a series of novels, with a cast of characters introduced and presumably more fully developed in earlier novels.

Unfortunately, though I enjoyed Douglas Preston's recent best-selling sci-fi thriller, Impact also reviewed here on Facebook , but did not much like this one, a bit of airport trash he co-wrote with Lincoln Child.

Unfortunately, though I think the authors intended it to be, it is anything but a stand-alone novel. Odd and peripheral characters are constantly being introduced with no explanation of what may have gone before -- two separate female characters had apparently been attacked and almost murdered in previous novels; another seems to a scientific and philosophical experiment, a year-old savant in the body of a woman in her 20s, with the social skills and worldly experience of a home-schooled year-old -- and you never quite grasp who these people are or why they are important.

The main characters, two brothers, are well explained, though improbable -- one is an evil genius, the other a good genius, each gifted with essentially superhuman powers.

And there's a female police captain, who is always referred to by her title, which is Captain of Homicide -- a most un-American kind of title, although she's NYPD.

In parts of the book it is all too clear that two writers are at work, often at cross purposes. In a climactic scene, the evil brother retreats to his volcanic island fortress, and suspecting that the year-old year-old woman has tracked him down and is even now climbing the volcano to reach his fortress, barricades himself deep within, surrounded by 3-foot-thick stone walls -- yet he not only hears her knock on the door, he says "who's there?

The plot, the cliffhangers, the main characters and some of the peripheral ones all have this in common: And yet this is not a comic book, or a fantasy like Harry Potter -- it's supposed to be a thriller, based in modern life and experience, and thus remotely possible.

Well, it ain't, and I didn't like it. This book is the last of the little trilogy within the Pendergast series that started with Brimstone and Dance of Death.

While I was really looking forward to reading it, I started out a bit slow, first because I was in the middle of a different book when my library order came in, and I started playing Dishonored on my and was trying to figure out what I was doing without dying too often.

But then I got a few chapters in and couldn't stop reading! All sorts of suspenseful things were going on This book is the last of the little trilogy within the Pendergast series that started with Brimstone and Dance of Death.

All sorts of suspenseful things were going on all at once, and this is one book where, if you read at least the previous book, you know exactly who the bad guy is, but none of the other characters do, and so you may find yourself yelling like me, "Noooo, don't listen to him!

Don't go in there with him! In any case, really good fun. Never a dull moment at that Museum! Feb 21, kartik narayanan rated it liked it.

The Book of the Dead is another so-so entry in the Pendergast-verse and brings the Diogenes trilogy to an end hopefully!

It suffers from the same malaise as the previous couple of books in that the antagonist is boring and the story boils down to Batman chasing the Joker in the Dark Knight.

There is no mystery and the protagonists are basically boring while having the ability to foresee random events. And the ending is ambiguous enough without any form of closure.

I hope the next book The Book of the Dead is another so-so entry in the Pendergast-verse and brings the Diogenes trilogy to an end hopefully!

I hope the next book will be a return to the core pendergast values. Jan 13, Rob Thompson rated it really liked it Shelves: This is the seventh book in the Special Agent Pendergast series.

Also, it is the third and final installment to the trilogy concentrating on Pendergast and his relationship with Lieutenant Vincent D'Agosta in their pursuit to stop Pendergast's brother, Diogenes.

Preston and Child call these books the Diogenes trilogy. As for the action side of things, there's a heck of a lot going on, but I'm still finding it a hard slog.

Even with all the flash-bang-dazzle going on in the Tomb, I seem to be reading it from a distance, not really engaged. And please - no more virtual reality day-trips through his own mind for Aloysius!

I won't be buying any more books in this series. It's been beaten to death. Maybe it's time to move on to a new gang of oddball characters and blow up something else?

This book holds reader's attention and focus with every page from beginning to end. The plot while complicated, some might even say convoluted, was not at all difficult to follow and all aspects meshed together in perfect symmetry.

There were no loose ends left hanging. In short, I gave this book a 5 Star rating because there was nothing about it I did not like. In fact it motivated me to purchase all the other novels in the Pendergast Series.

Now that I don't have to worry about where to put all the books I buy and read I have branched out. Due to the ludicrous costs of some of my go to authors I have stopped reading quite a few of them and have been reading "new" to me authors.

I'd heard of these two before so I decided to try their works. My first book was a Pendergast mystery. It "grabbed me", was fast paced, quirky, interesting, informative and tough to put down.

Really, really tough to put down. I liked the book so much I bought all the Pendergast series and read one right after the other.

Pendergast is an odd one and would never exist in real life, particularly in the cookie cutter FBI , but this is fiction and we all want a hero to have what he needs at his disposal and doing it in style is not a bad way to go.

All the characters came to life for me. I shared D'Agosta's frustrations and concerns. I asked the same questions. Felt the same emotions.

If you like fiction, mystery, a little fantasy thrown in for good measure, you will love these authors and their star characters, FBI Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast and Lt.

I read all of this series and give a five star rating to each book. I thought the story was too convoluted for my taste.

Some parts of the plot were tied together feebly in my opinion. The book started out well enough. There was an ancient Egyptian exhibit set to open at a museum and then strange events and deaths occurred that seemed to suggest to some that a curse was attached to this exhibit.

Then the story introduced several subplots that were spun out with inadequate background information so they seemed contrived. I was disappointed in the book.

So l would rate the book as a little below average as a piece of entertainment. I can imagine them structuring this book, three stories overlapping and integrated in the final chapters.

As in other books I've read, there's all the drama anyone could ask for. These authors have that unique skill of lifting a reader to levels of concern, uncertainty, disbelief and fear growing to a sustained level for long periods, pitching adrenaline so high that the reader must take a break to recapture reason.

As in the other four books I've read, they are masters of suspense! This is a Can't Put Down book. I recently reread this because it was suggested by the authors.

This book is the third book in the "Diogenes Trilogy". I had forgotten a lot of it, and was glad to reread it, so I am all ready for when the new book shows up for me.

This is also a good book in its own right. Why not five stars? By this seventh book, you already know most of the tricks the authors hold in their sleeves.

One person found this helpful. What first thing that came to mind reading this book is how well I could relate. I too have a good memory and can remember back before my younger sister could walk or talk and we are only 18 months apart.

I never gave repressed memories a second thought until I realized it happened to me and I was with my sister when the event occurred. It is a shocking feeling.

The second was - Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned, Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned. Even an extremely intelligent, psychopath, mass murderer has reason to be afraid.

See all reviews.

Teil der Pendergast Triologie verspricht Spannung pur! Testen Sie jetzt alle Amazon Prime-Vorteile. The Cabinet of Academica coimbra Agent Pendergast series. Am Schluss ist insgesamt eigentlich nicht viel anders als am Anfang, es ist absolut klar, dass man sich auch das nächste Buch wird kaufen müssen, vielleicht geht da die Sache ja endlich weiter The Wheel of Darkness: And the ultimate challenge: Nach Brimstone folgt also Dance of the Death. Grand Central Publishing Especially Diogenes character could use some more depth and explanation. Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch. Anxious of the bad press coverage the museum is facing given that Diogenes destroyed the world most famous diamond collection, distraction is urgently needed, and it comes in the form of a spectacular reopening an ancient Agyptian tomb, namely the tomb of Senef. Lincoln Child is a former book editor who has published five novels of his own, including the huge bestseller Deep Storm. An sich Beste Spielothek in Sus finden sich das Buch flüssig, mehrere Handlungsstränge werden verfolgt, die Autoren schaffen es, das man sehr unwahrscheinliche Dinge nicht als störend empfindet.

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